Preparing Matcha at home

06

Less effort is required to prepare Matcha at home than is often thought. Still, several points should be carefully observed in order to achieve the perfect Matcha taste as well the full effect/benefit of its health-improving properties.

  • Ensure that the softest possible water with a pH under 7 is used
  • Here it is not only important that the water be fresh, but also that it is heated until just before it bubbles up strongly. Otherwise the pH value will be raised, negatively affecting the taste of the tea.
  • Once the water has cooled to 80 degrees, it has the perfect temperature.
  • For every cup of Matcha one gram of Matcha powder is needed. This is one to two bamboo spoonfuls, or exactly half a teaspoon.
  • The water containing the Matcha now needs to be beaten with a bamboo whisk for about 15 seconds, until the tea becomes frothy. A teaspoon is not suitable here as stirring will cause clumps to form.
  • As long as you are not afraid of breaking with tradition, an electric Matcha-whisk can of course also be used. You won’t save a huge amount of time by doing it this way, but sometimes seconds can be critical or there is simply no bamboo whisk available.  An electric whisk can often be found at the workplace, since a battery-operated milk frother will perform exactly the same function.

Here you will find a video on YouTube where the correct preparation is demonstrated:

Preparing Matcha at home

As long as you are not afraid of breaking with tradition, an electric Matcha-whisk can of course also be used. You won’t save a huge amount of time by doing it this way, but sometimes seconds can be critical or there is simply no bamboo whisk available.  An electric whisk can often be found at the workplace, since a battery-operated milk frother will perform exactly the same function.

Note in addition that once opened, the Matcha tin should be stored in the refrigerator in order to maintain its flavour.  Filtering the Matcha through a small sieve into the cup or over food also offers a way to avoid possible clumping.

Continue to → The right way to sample Matcha